Episode 07: Chief Standing Bear (Part 02)

In 1879, the trial of Chief Standing Bear changed the legal standing of Native Americans. Special guest Taylor Keen, a Creighton University professor and Chautauqua historical interpreter, discusses the life of the Ponca leader. Part two includes the Standing Bear trial, insight into Keen’s role as a Standing Bear historical interpreter, the Chief’s legacy on both the city and the nation, the bill in the Nebraska legislature regarding Chief Standing Bear and Indigenous Leaders’ Day, and Keen’s Sacred Seed project.

Episode 07: Chief Standing Bear (Part 01)

In 1879, the trial of Chief Standing Bear changed the legal standing of Native Americans. Special guest Taylor Keen, a Creighton University professor and Chautauqua historical interpreter, discusses the life of the Ponca leader. Part one includes Standing Bear’s early life, the failure of the US Government to respect the treaties, and the subsequent forced removal of the Ponca Nation to Oklahoma, and the trial of Standing Bear.

Episode 06: Code Name Omaha Beach

Gayle EylerOn June 6, 1944, Allied forces infamously stormed the beaches at Normandy. The five beaches were given code names: Gold, Sword, Juno, Utah, and Omaha. How did Omaha Beach get its code name?

Omaha carpenter Gayle Eyler was drafted in 1943, and found himself converting apartments in London into the headquarters utilized for planning the invasion of Normandy. Eyler left behind a letter which details his WWII experience, which included being the origin of the code name “Omaha Beach.” Eyler’s son, Eric, makes a special guest appearance to discuss his dad’s unique story.

Episode 05: The Omaha Saloon Scandal

IScreen Shot 2016-05-15 at 9.23.35 PMn 1885, there was quite the presidential scandal, originating from a saloon in Omaha. Rutherford B. Hayes, a temperance man who famously banned alcohol from the White House, was found to be the owner of the property on which a saloon was operating in Omaha.

Discover the fickle nature of temperance politics, the twenty year long business arrangement between Hayes and Omaha real estate agent Byron Reed, and how this great city became the spark for a 19th century presidential scandal!

Episode 04: Byron Reed

BRPICThis episode we bring you the fascinating life of Byron Reed. Reed was one of the founding fathers of the city of Omaha, and left behind an incredible legacy. His impressive collection of rare books, documents, and coins was gifted to the city and is now displayed and kept at the Durham Museum. We discuss Reed’s life, projects, and offer our perspectives of his collection, which we worked with as museum interns.

 

A special thank you to Pat to working with us to figure out the William Phillips/William A. Phillips situation. We may not have solved the mystery, but you can explore it for yourself and draw your own conclusions at Pat’s blog, Freedmen’s Patrol: Exploring the Civil War Era. Thanks, Pat!

Episode 03: Larry Bader/Fritz Johnson

Fritz Johnson practices archery in the backyard of his Omaha home. From LIFE magazine.
Fritz Johnson practices archery in the backyard of his Omaha home. From LIFE magazine.

Larry Bader disappeared after a storm on Lake Erie, and his empty boat was found the next day. A few days later, a man who looked just like him showed up in Omaha, Nebraska, claiming to be Fritz Johnson.

The Bader/Johnson saga is a fascinating tale of a popular Omaha disc jockey and television personality.

Episode 02: The Bombing in Dundee

bombing_sidebarThe Dundee area of Omaha was bombed by the Japanese during WWII. How did this even happen? Was Omaha a specific target, or was this a random event? Why was the incident shrouded in such secrecy?

We would like to thank Hal Capps for sharing his memories of this unique aspect of Omaha History!

Dr. Charles A. Henry – Bibliography

Primary sources: Records of sessions and First Dragoons muster roll, which are part of the Byron Reed Collection at the Durham Museum (and currently on display).

 

Secondary sources:

Savage, James Woodruff, John T. Bell, and Consul Willshire Butterfield. 1894. History of the City of Omaha, Nebraska. New York: Munsell & Co.

Sorenson, Alfred Rasmus. 1889. History of Omaha from the Pioneer Days to the Present Time. Omaha: Gibson, Miller & Richardson.

Wakeley, Arthur C. n.d. Omaha: the Gate City and Douglas County, Nebraska; A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement. Tucson, Arizona: Americana Unlimited.

Morton, J. Sterling, Albert Watkins, and George Le Forest Miller. 1905. Illustrated History of Nebraska: A History of Nebraska from the Earliest Explorations of the Trans-Mississippi Region, with steel engravings, photogravures, copper plates, maps, and tables. Lincoln: J. North.

Nebraska State Historical Society. 1885. Publications – Nebraska State Historical Society. [Lincoln, etc.]: Nebraska State Historical Society.

Episode 01: Dr. Charles A. Henry

CharlesaHenryDr. Charles A. Henry was accused of killing a man over a land dispute in 1855. Was is murder or self defense? And how is it that an outbreak of a deadly illness perhaps saved Henry’s life? From physician to pharmacist to Civil War spy, Dr. Henry was a busy and colorful contribution to Omaha history.